Questions that Must be Answered About 911

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It is hard to believe that the 911 events took place ten years ago. It is also hard to believe that so many questions have gone unanswered and that there has been so much apathy among the public masses, to uncover the truth behind the 911 catastrophe.

Here are some of the issues that remain unanswered:

Analysis: Beyond debt woes, a wider crisis of globalization?

The crises at the heart of the international financial and political system go beyond the debt woes currently gripping the Western world and to the heart of the way the global economy has been run for over two decades.

After relying on it to deliver years of growth, lift millions from poverty, keep living standards rising and citizens happy, nation states look to have lost control of globalization.

world exchange

A television journalist looks at a display board shortly after the local market opened at the Australian Stock Exchange in Sydney, August 5, 2011.

In the short-term, that leaves policymakers looking impotent in the face of fast-moving markets and other uncontrolled and perhaps uncontrollable systems — undermining their authority and potentially helping fuel a wider backlash and social unrest.

In the longer run, there are already signs the world could repeat the mistakes of the 1930s and retreat into protectionism and political polarization. There are few obvious solutions, and some of the underlying problems have been building for a long time.

“In times of economic recession, countries tend to become isolationist and retrench from globalization,” says Celina Realuyo, assistant professor of National Security affairs at the US National Defense University in Washington DC.

“Given the increased number of stakeholders on any issue — climate change, the global financial system, cyber security — it is unclear how traditional nation states can lead on any issue, let alone build consensus globally,” she said.

The financial system, the Internet and even the supply chains for natural resources have quietly slipped beyond effective forms of state control.

These instruments of globalization have delivered huge wealth and kept economies moving with arguably greater efficiency, but can also swiftly turn on those in authority.

Just as Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak discovered that shutting down the Internet was not enough to prevent social-media fueled protest overthrowing him, the world’s most powerful nation states are confronting their helplessness in controlling markets and financial flows.

Technology and deregulation allow both information and assets to be transferred around the world faster than ever before — perhaps faster than states can possibly control, even with sophisticated laws, censorship and other controls.

The broad consensus at the 2009 London G20 meeting has already been replaced by a much uglier tone of polarization and mutual recrimination at both domestic and international levels.

Where once they would have lobbied quietly, Russia and China now angrily criticize the United States, with Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin describing it as an economic “parasite.”

In the United States and Europe, far right groups including the Tea Party, euro-sceptics and nationalist forces look to be rising, sometimes potentially blocking policy-making. On the left, calls grow for greater controls on unfettered markets and capital.

Over the past year, global currency valuations have become the source of new international tensions as major states accuse each other of “competitive devaluation” to boost exports.

In cyberspace, nations worry powerful computer attacks on essential systems could one day spark war, with rows over cyber spying already fuelling mutual distrust.

CENSORSHIP, CONTROLS IMPOSSIBLE?

It’s unlikely that nations can genuinely pull back from globalised systems on which they have become reliant.

“The Net sees censorship as damage and routes around it,” computer science guru John Gilmore said in 1993. In the modern, high-speed globalised system, one could say the same of attempts at financial and economic restrictions.

Many areas of the global economy have also become effectively “ungoverned space” into which a host of actors — from criminals to international firms such as Google and Goldman Sachs to countless other individuals and groups — have enthusiastically jumped.

International companies and rich individuals move money — and even entire manufacturing operations — from jurisdiction to jurisdiction to seek low wages, avoid tax, regulation and sometimes even detection. In many states, that helped fuel a growing wealth gap that is self producing new tensions.

Some argue demands to impose new controls may miss the point. In any case, many of the current crises in the system are the result of attempts to control or distort markets and economic flows.

“Ironically, the theory was always that.. the (euro) single currency would stop the unpleasant capitalists from destabilizing Europe,” says Charles Robertson, chief economist at Russian-British bank Renaissance Capital, pointing to its intention of freeing European states from never-ending local foreign exchange hassles.

“So the short answer is no, without massive capital controls, states cannot stop this.”

Arguably, the wider global financial system has similar inbuilt problems and imbalances — but after decades of being largely ignored, they look to be unraveling rapidly, by the same fast-moving markets that previously fed them.

That is a problem not just for already struggling Western countries but the emerging powerhouses some hoped would replace them as a source of global leadership.

UNSUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS UNRAVEL?

“For most of the last decade, growth and economic activity in many places has been driven by forces that were inherently unsustainable,” says Simon Derrick, head of foreign exchange at Bank of New York Mellon.

“What’s happening now is these… are coming under pressure and it’s getting to the stage where that can no longer be ignored. But none of these issues are going to be politically easy to do anything about.”

Low U.S. interest rates and taxes particularly after 9/11 and the dot-com crash fueled the asset booms that produced the credit crunch.

But they were only sustainable in part because U.S. government spending — including on expensive foreign wars — was effectively underwritten by emerging economies, particularly China, buying up their debt.

Beijing could make those purchases because it was earning billions from soaring exports underpinned by what most observers agree was an unrealistically low-pegged currency.

Those dynamics fueled record economic growth that help to maintain domestic stability. If that slows, some worry unrest could return — particularly if Chinese Internet controls and other domestic security measures prove as unable to control dissent as the admittedly less sophisticated systems of North Africa.

Critics say most attempted financial crisis fixes — bailouts and stimuli– have simply “kicked the can down the road,” providing short-term relief but little more.

“Nobody’s kicking a bigger can with more force than the Chinese government,” wrote Ian Bremmer, president of political risk consultancy Eurasia Group. “The entrenched dominance of their state-led economy has created the greatest near-term buffer to instability in the developing world… (but it is also) by far, the most unsustainable and volatile long-term.”

‘Aftershock’ Book Predicts Economic Disaster Amid Controversary

Robert Wiedemer’s new book, “Aftershock: Protect Yourself and Profit in the Next Global Financial Meltdown,” quickly is becoming the survival guide for the 21st century. And Newsmax’s eye-opening Aftershock Survival Summit video, with exclusive interviews and prophetic predictions, already has affected millions around the world — but not without ruffling a few feathers.

Initially screened for a private audience, this gripping video exposed harsh economic truths and garnered an overwhelming amount of feedback.

“People were sitting up and taking notice, and they begged us to make the video public so they could easily share it,” said Newsmax Financial Publisher Aaron DeHoog.

But that wasn’t as simple as it seems. Various online networks repeatedly shut down the controversial video. “People were sending their friends and family to dead links, so we had to create a dedicated home for it,” DeHoog said.

(Editor’s NoteWatch Bob Wiedemer’s Aftershock Survival Summit video

This wasn’t the first time Wiedemer’s predictions hit a nerve. In 2006, he was one of three economists who co-authored a book correctly warning that the real estate boom and Wall Street bull run were about to end. A prediction Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke and his predecessor, Alan Greenspan, were not about to support publicly.

Realizing that the worst was yet to come, Wiedemer and company quickly penned “Aftershock.” However, just before it was publicly released, the publisher yanked the final chapter, deeming it too controversial for newsstand and online outlets such as Amazon.com.

“We got lucky,” DeHoog said. “I happened to read the original version, which contained this ‘unpublished chapter,’ which I think is the most crucial in the entire book. Wiedemer gave Newsmax permission to share this chapter with our readers.”

With daily economic forecasts projecting doom and gloom and no recovery in sight, people need to learn how to survive economic disaster. During the past quarter alone, unemployment skyrocketed to 9 percent. Inflation continues to soar and the U.S. national debt crisis is still on the fence between raising the debt ceiling or massive budget cuts, with no resolution in sight.

During Newsmax’s Aftershock Survival Summit video, Wiedemer discusses the dire consequences of Washington, D.C.’s, bipartisan, multi-decade “borrow-and-spend” agenda. He also explores the inflation nightmare, the impending plunge in home prices, the looming collapse of the stock and bond markets, a possible historic surge in unemployment, and how to survive what life in America will be like in the days of the “Aftershock.”

Despite appearances, Aftershock is not a book with the singular intention of scaring the heck out of people. Although it does provide a harsh outlook for the economic future of America, the true value lies in the wealth of investment tips, analyses, predictions, budget advice, and sound economic guidance that people can act on immediately, offering a ray of recovery hope and an indispensable blueprint for life after shock.

Viewers of Newsmax’s Aftershock Survival Summit video heard detailed advice for handling credit card debt, home and car loans, life insurance, unemployment issues, how to beat inflation, making personal budget cuts and many more recovery tools to survive the economic aftershock. They also took advantage of a special Newsmax offer for a free copy of the new edition of “Aftershock,” which includes the final “unpublished chapter.”

(Editor’s Note: Watch Bob Wiedemer’s Aftershock Survival Summit video

For a limited time, Newsmax is showing the Aftershock Survival Summit and supplying viewers with free copies of the “Aftershock” book (while supplies last).

Read more on Newsmax.com: ‘Aftershock’ Book Predicts Economic Disaster Amid Controversy
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